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ONE Campaign and the Electrify Africa Act

Mike and Blaine: One Campaign Petition Delivery

Mike Hogan of the ONE Texas office and I were pleased to deliver a petition in favor of The Electrify Africa Act to Blaine Fulmer, formerly of U.S. Congressman Michael T. McCaul’s office in Austin. Thanks to everyone who signed it!

The Electrify Africa Act of 2015“Helping sub-Saharan Africa increase modern electricity access will save lives, boost education, alleviate extreme poverty and accelerate growth.

I became an advocate for ONE Campaign when living in San Antonio, Texas ca. 2012. I carried that interest with me when I returned to Austin in mid-2013. I have enjoyed working with the Texas staff representative for ONE. My first few years living and working in Austin were in District 10; I now live in District 21 in South Austin (post updated from 2015 to 2017).

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Mike Hogan is shown at left with ONE colleagues while conducting a “Strengthie” photo campaign at Stouthaus Coffee Pub in South Austin.

After many years of intense major gift fundraising work with a number of worthy nonprofit projects across the state of Texas, the economic downturn allowed me “quiet time” to return to some of my other life interests. From my young days in grade school I was fascinated by Africa and the Middle East. I watched television programs about them, and voraciously read Time Life books my parents had acquired for my edification, over and over again. Then, when I was in high school, my parents paid for a month-long family trip to the Middle East and North Africa, where my interests were deepened even further.

What is ONE Campaign?

“ONE is a campaigning and advocacy organization of more than seven million people around the world taking action to end extreme poverty and preventable disease, particularly in Africa.

We believe the fight against poverty isn’t about charity, but about justice and equality.

Whether lobbying political leaders in world capitals or running cutting-edge grassroots campaigns, ONE pressures governments to do more to fight AIDS and other preventable, treatable diseases in the poorest places on the planet, to empower small-holder farmers, to expand access to energy, and to combat corruption so governments are accountable to their citizens. Cofounded by Bono and other activists, ONE is strictly nonpartisan.”

Why should someone like me support critical needs like electricity for Africa?

First, let me share an insight observation:

“This notion that we can be an island unto ourselves, I don’t think is realistic in the world we live in … But this notion that we should cut off all foreign aid, when it’s less than 1 percent of the budget and when it’ll isolate us from the world and hurt our national security – I don’t think that makes sense.” ~Senator Kelly Ayotte (R-NH), Member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, February 23, 2012

I believe Africa represents the future of our world. It has so much promise on every level! But also, allowing horrible living conditions, dire poverty, disease and ignorance to persist means many issues here at home like national security are negatively impacted. Problems overseas can quickly become our own problems, as we have seen time and time again. With relatively little expense, these international challenges can be alleviated for the benefit of the entire human race.

And as a member of the Board of Directors of IREC: Interstate Renewable Energy Council, I am particularly devoted to clean energy, not only across the United States, but globally.

Did you know:

“In sub-Saharan Africa, more than 620 million people do not have access to electricity. Thirty seven countries in sub-Saharan Africa have a national electrification rate of below 50 percent. These endemic power shortages affect all aspects of life. The President and Congress are working with African leaders, civil society organizations, and the private sector to dramatically change this dire situation. We know energy access is one of the most urgent priorities for people in sub-Saharan Africa with one in five Africans citing infrastructure – including electricity – as their most pressing concern.

The lack of electricity impacts people’s lives in at least five major ways, with a disproportionately negative impact on girls and women.”

An article posted by the World Economic Forum, “Can Africa Lead the Green Energy Revolution” notes:

“Africa’s 900 million people use less energy than Spain’s 47 million. In sub-Saharan Africa, 621 million people have no electricity whatsoever. Each year, 600,000 Africans – half of them children – die from household air pollution, caused by fuelwood and charcoal used for cooking.”

Clearly, the world must support African leaders as they work to improve this dire situation.

When I went off to college to The University of Texas at Austin in the 1970s, I was fortunate to study African literature with Dr. Bernth Lindfors. You might enjoy reading about Dr. Lindfors in this outstanding online journal, “Life and Letters: The One And Only Bernth Lindfors” (page 6).

When reading African literature, I was inspired by its grace and wisdom. As Nigerian writer Chinua Achebe said,

“Once you allow yourself to identify with the people in a story, then you might begin to see yourself in that story even if on the surface it’s far removed from your situation. This is what I try to tell my students: this is one great thing that literature can do – it can make us identify with situations and people far away.”

That is exactly what African literature did for me. You might consider African authors the next time you are seeking a good book to read. Follow the link to Goodreads to find more impressive books and authors.

Support ONE Campaign today and help release millions of Africans from the grip of extreme poverty. The Electrify Africa Act is one terrific way this can be accomplished, but be sure to visit other pages on the website for more ways you can help.

Thank you!

The trip abroad mentioned in this post was organized by the Houston division of Neiman Marcus, many years ago when I was still in high school. My father’s company had done well, and we were able to avail ourselves of the best in the business. It was the trip of a lifetime, and I continue to thank my father and Neiman Marcus for it! I feel like I “grew up” during that expedition. We saw both glorious monuments, and the most shocking poverty imaginable (life outside the suburbs of Houston is not what I expected). I needed that.

 

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