Professional Development

Click to reach a search on U.S. World & News Report on top graduate programs.

Click to reach a search on U.S. World & News Report on top graduate programs.

There are several organizations that can help you advance your career in the nonprofit sector. I have chosen to highlight just a few on this page. Be sure to search online for other nonprofit support organizations that serve specific sectors in which you are interested, like higher education and health.

A helpful providers list is also shared¬†by CFRE International on the¬†“Participating Organisations” page. For more immediate and short-term needs, The Foundation Center shares a page of helpful advice and links on, “Where Can I Find Fundraising Training.”

You might also enjoy reading my blog post, “Mentoring and ‘Real World’ Fundraising.” There I discuss how I entered the nonprofit sector years ago, and I share some advice as well.

Association of Donor Relations Professionals (ADRP)

ADRP was founded in 2004, however, its beginnings can be traced back to the first New England Stewardship Conference (NESC) in 1990. Far fewer advancement officers were specifically involved in stewardship then, but a small group of professionals recognized the unique aspects of their work, and understood its importance to the advancement of philanthropy. Pooling resources, they staged their first conference in order to share information with peers from other institutions.

The core purpose of the Association of Donor Relations Professionals is to advance philanthropy through elevating donor relations and stewardship. ADRP leads the profession. Its intent is to focus on the outcomes of philanthropic relationships between organizations and donors. Members are affiliated with the leading advocate for the profession and receive access to a growing network of colleagues, experts, and vendors, informational webinars on a wide range of topics; discounted registration for conference and workshop attendance; a monthly electronic newsletter; online resource of stewardship materials, procedures, and samples; and access to an international list of job postings.

Association of Fundraising Professionals (AFP)

Association of Fundraising Professionals:¬†“AFP, an association of professionals throughout the world, advances philanthropy by enabling people and organizations to practice ethical and effective fundraising. The core activities through which AFP fulfills this mission include education, training, mentoring, research, credentialing and advocacy.”

Association of Professional Researchers for Advancement (APRA)

APRA is the premier international organization for fundraisers who specialize in research, analytics, relationship and information management. The association grew out of the Minnesota Prospect Research Association and quickly became a national organization as researchers across the country joined to attend APRA’s first conference in September, 1988.

Today, APRA represents more than 2,500 development professionals around the world who are dedicated to empowering the nonprofit community by meeting its data and information needs (membership information may be found by clicking on the link). APRA is committed to providing leading-edge educational and networking opportunities to fundraising research professionals; establishing and promoting high professional standards and ethical guidelines; and providing advocacy and a representative voice for the profession. For a sampling of educational offerings, see: Data Analytics.

Certified Fund Raising Executive International (CFRE)

CFRE International offers the only internationally-recognized baseline¬†professional credential for philanthropic fundraising executives.¬†See the CFRE International website for information regarding formal fundraising certification and examination “prep” courses being conducted in cities across the United States. On a personal note, I took the two-day course in order to prepare for the CFRE examination, and found it very helpful. I have written an article on my blog about the importance of securing the CFRE designation, which you can read by following this link, “Certified Fund Raising Executive: Why Bother?”

Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy (CAP)

The Chartered Advisor in Philanthropy program provides the knowledge and tools needed to help clients articulate and advance their highest aspirations for self, family, and society. The CAP program involves graduate-level courses (and, in the process, one can earn credit toward a Master of Science in Financial Services degree). The CAP¬ģ program is designed for self-study, leading to an objective exam in a local exam center. CAP is administered by The American College of Financial Services.

On a personal note, I was invited to participate in CAP via U.S. Trust. I have not had the time to do so, but I plan on it in the future. Follow the link to read some of the company’s reports, which are insightful.

Galvanize and General Assembly (GA)

While it is not focused on philanthropy per se, Galvanize and¬†General Assembly can help those who have an interest in developing their social media, marketing and “tech” skills. As we all know, new technologies are helping nonprofits run more smoothly and efficiently, and to communicate more effectively. There are also educational programs available¬†for startups that would apply handily to social good startups. Some classes may be taken in-person or online. Certification is available.

Grant Professionals Association (GPA)

The Grant Professionals Association (GPA), builds and supports an international community of grant professionals committed to serving the greater public good by practicing the highest ethical and professional standards. To achieve this mission, GPA serves as a leading authority and resource for the practice of grantsmanship in all sectors of the field; it advances the field by promoting professional growth and development; and it enhances the public image and recognition of the profession within the greater philanthropic, public, and private funding communities. If you are interested in professional certification, please visit the website for the Grant Professionals Certification Institute.

The Grantsmanship Center

My nonprofit career began when I took a week-long course at The Grantsmanship Center in Los Angeles, California with Norton Kiritz.¬†The Grantsmanship Center was founded in 1972 to offer grantsmanship training to nonprofit and government agencies. “Before this time, no such training existed and small organizations often lacked the skills to compete for grant opportunities. The Center began as a local project in Los Angeles, but as word of its alumni’s successes spread, demand for trainings rapidly expanded. By 1975, The Grantsmanship Center was conducting more than 100 workshops a year across the country.”

NTEN: Nonprofit Technology Network

If you want to keep up with the latest trends and techniques in nonprofit technologies, I recommend joining NTEN. NTEN aspires to a world where all nonprofit organizations use technology skillfully and confidently to meet community needs and fulfill their missions.

“We enable our members to strategically use technology to make the world a better, just, and equitable place.¬†NTEN facilitates the exchange of knowledge and information within our community. We connect our members to each other, provide professional development opportunities, educate our constituency on issues of technology use in nonprofits, and spearhead groundbreaking research, advocacy, and education on technology issues affecting our entire community.”

Several of NTEN’s educational programs now qualify for continuing education credits from CFRE International. The annual NTC: Nonprofit Technology Conference is a wonderful opportunity to learn from experts in just a few days about the many helpful ways to make use of various technologies. I have been a speaker at two prior NTCs, and each time I attend, I learn something new.

Follow this link to learn about a few of NTEN’s nonprofit technology initiatives.

National Association of Charitable Gift Planners (formerly, Partnership for Philanthropic Planning or PPP)

Originally created in 1988, the National Association of Charitable Gift Planning¬†is¬†the leading organization setting standards for charitable gift planners. It brings members together to learn, connect and advocate. It provides education and resources that enrich and advance careers. It¬†connects colleagues at all levels through its¬†national network‚ÄĒincluding those who defined the field. It exists to serve its¬†distinguished profession and bring to life the art and science of charitable gift planning.

“CGP helps enrich and advance members‚Äô work and careers through education, resources and advocacy. We are a robust network of gift planning professionals at all levels, including the leaders who defined our field, and the innovators who will transform our profession and the world.”

Rosetta Thurman

The business and nonprofit sectors have evolved dramatically over the course of the past few years; I believe a fresh, new approach to career development is in order! I’ve had the good fortune of hearing Rosetta Thurman speak on two occasions about advancing one’s nonprofit career. Her website provides a great deal of helpful, timely information about becoming a “nonprofit rockstar.”¬†Rosetta has also wrote¬†a book with colleague Trista Harris in 2011 that you might want to consider, “How to Become a Nonprofit Rockstar, 50 Ways to Accelerate Your Career.”¬†It is still ahead of its time several years later!

Vocational Schools

Many vocational schools provide training for jobs that nonprofits also need and sometimes require. By way of example, I found this helpful list of vocational schools on the website of the Austin Independent School District. I hold two university degrees, but as time moves forward and after working with many nonprofit organizations, I know the value of “real world” training for¬†specific skills.

On a personal note, on two occasions early in my career I took vocational school courses on typing – that’s it – just typing. I now type almost as fast as I can talk, and I eliminated the need for a secretary in my now-advanced major gift fundraising work. As nonprofits strive to become more lean and efficient, these simple but genuinely helpful hands-on skills are more valuable than ever.

You might also enjoy reading, “Save Your Money, Skip the MBA, And Go To Startup Grad School Instead” from Fast Company (August, 2016). I hold two university degrees and while I am proud of them, I know several people who have thrived in life by¬†pursuing their dreams in other ways. And many startup educational programs provide knowledge that social good startups need, too!

One thought on “Professional Development

  1. Pingback: Lots of Zeros | Carolyn's Nonprofit Blog

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