Resources to Combat Hate Speech

Hate

The past few years, I have been volunteering for the NTEN & NetSquared Nonprofit Tech Club Austin. The club is affiliated with both NTEN: Nonprofit Technology Network and NetSquared, a division of TechSoup. This means our “reach” is both national and global.

One benefit of our partnership with NetSquared specifically is we learn of ideas from other tech club chapters as well as from TechSoup and its divisions like Caravan Studios and the Public Good App House. A webinar on hate speech and those tracking it globally was held in April 2019. I wanted to share information presented during that program, and at the conclusion, I add more information and resources.

Resources

On a personal note, a few years ago I seemed to be living under the illusion that the United States was more egalitarian and tolerant than ever. I did not see racism in Texas, and mostly witnessed a fair amount of appreciation for differences in terms of culture and ethnicity. But in 2016, an eruption of hateful speech occurred from which I am still reeling. It was like a long dormant volcano had erupted, causing an international avalanche of hateful behavior. This led me to seek solutions about how to combat hate.

The following organizations are working to identify, monitor and to develop ways to combat hateful rhetorical around the world.


Achol Mach Jok, Specialist | PeaceTech Lab (Africa)

We believe everyone has the power of peacetech so we leverage low-cost, easy-to-use tech and local partnerships to put the right tools in the hands of the people best positioned to make a difference: activists, peacebuilders, and NGOs in some of the most violent places on earth.

Timothy Quinn, Chief Technology Officer | Hatebase

Hatebase is a software platform built to help organizations and online communities detect, monitor and quarantine hate speech. Our algorithms analyze public conversations using a broad vocabulary based on nationality, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, disability and class, with data across 80+ languages and 200+ countries.

Christopher Tuckwood, Principal | Hatebase

Filip Stojanovski, Program Coordinator | Metamorphosis Foundation

The Metamorphosis Foundation offers IT solutions, developed according to the needs of the clients or as part of the project. At the same time, we offer favorable and quality services for development, adaptation, localization and updating of web content.

The IT industry is constantly on the rise with new solutions and innovations, whereby the needs of changes in the operation also arise. We test and evaluate opportunities every day, working with new partners to provide the highest quality services.

Additional Resources

  • ADL: Fighting Hate for Good. To learn more about the work of the Anti-Defamation League to combat hate, follow the link. “ADL’s dual mission includes a mandate to secure justice and fair treatment to all. Hate and violence have a chilling effect on society. In ADL’s tradition of calling out what divides us and shining a light on what can unite people, we work with diverse communities and with law enforcement to identify hate and then to mobilize people to work vigorously against it.”
  • ADL Hate Symbols Database. Get to know hate symbols by visiting the database. To read about the “ok” symbol and precautions, follow this link.
  • You might also like to follow the Public Good Tech Combating Hate Speech Pinterest board, where Caravan Studios is curating tech solutions and discussions on combating hate speech. They note, “we encourage you to include your own links to relevant resources, important data sets, lexicons, and reports by adding them into the editable Webinar Resources doc.”
  • The United Nations shared, “UN Strategy and Plan of Action on Hate Speech,” and you can view it by following the link. “Stopping Hate Speech” is a brief but insightful video about how hate crimes follow hate speech. “Words kill.”

  • Stomp Out Bullying has discussed hate speech in, “What We Can Do About Hate Speech” (April 22, 2019). “Currently, the U.S. has no concrete law that addresses or prevents hate speech. Sometimes the law may get involved if the hate speech is perceived as a genuine threat to harm, but most of the time there’s not a lot anyone can do legally. However, just because it isn’t technically considered a crime in the U.S., that doesn’t mean that hate speech doesn’t influence society.”
  • Take Back The Tech provides some excellent ideas in, “Hate speech: strategies” (no date).
  • Western States Center, “Confronting White Nationalism in Schools Toolkit” (referenced by PBS on November 19, 2019, see video below).

Positive Thinking Support

There are more helpful websites and apps than the below online, but I wanted to point out a few that I like.

  • Achieving Positive Thinking Worldwide is a California-based nonprofit that got in touch with me a few years ago via Carolyn’s Nonprofit Blog. Follow Yvette L. Kelley on social media for constant positive messages!
  • Carolyn’s Nonprofit Blog has from the beginning included a page devoted to dealing with stress, and stress can sadly lead to hateful behavior. Follow the link to read more. When I launched my blog back in 2011, I was deluged with requests for advice about dealing with stress. I decided to respond with some ideas.
  • Happify seeks to instill happiness. “… The brain we’re born with can be changed. Technically speaking, they call that neuroplasticity; we can change it by adopting new thought patterns, by training our brain as if it were a muscle, to overcome negative thoughts.”
  • Pozify is a social networking platform that rewards you for promoting and spreading positivity while solving the problem you can’t trust anything on the internet.
  • Stop, Breathe & Think is an app that helps users practice mindful breathing to create space between thoughts, emotions and reactions.

The two graphic designs that appear on this page were made by me using the Adobe Spark Post.

 

 

Digital Inclusion: As We Race Ahead, Let’s Be Sure No One is Left Behind

Google Fiber is a strong advocate for digital inclusion in Austin and across the nation. Shown is a panel discussion at Google Fiber Space a few years ago (my Instagram).

It is hard to imagine, but across the United States there are still many who have no idea how to use a computer. And while most people own mobile phones, access to wireless remains a constant challenge.

I don’t know about you, but I am highly cognizant of how most job applications are only available online today. Not knowing how to use email, Microsoft Word and the Internet (or simply not to have ready access to a wireless “hot spot”), prevents some from applying for jobs, pays bills, submitting inquiries for essential information, completing medical forms and the like. Even if “computer skills” are not part of the job description, to apply for them one must normally have access to a computer of some type. Time sheets, product inventories and cash registers are all connected to complex corporate networks, and they require employees to be competent – at least in a basic fashion – with using technology.

Austin Free-Net is a nonprofit organization with which I worked briefly a few years ago. This organization and others in Austin – including the City of Austin – are working to address these now-essential technology training needs. Executive Director Juanita Budd notes:

“When citizens cannot find work and families cannot support themselves, the repercussions echo throughout the community. Less people working means less tax revenue, while simultaneously there is an increased pressure on social services providers. A family might need an older child to quit school and go to work, which means the cycle of low-paying jobs continues for another generation. Improving the education and technical acumen of our residents will draw more businesses to Austin, increasing tax revenue and reducing unemployment. In short, a computer literate population makes a city stronger economically and makes us more attractive to new industry.”

Roca
Sotun Krouch of Roca spoke about his nonprofit’s use of data during the Social Solutions 2017 Impact Summit in Austin.

I was also pleased to attend the Social Solutions 2017 Impact Summit in September in Austin. During the event, Robert F. Smith of Vista Equity Partners spoke with Kristin Nimsger, CEO of Social Solutions. Part of the discussion is found below in my Facebook Live video (3 minutes). Robert discusses the need for effective use of data, the increasing digitization of business globally, and how everyone is struggling to keep up! This is certainly true for those who find themselves in low income and under served communities.

U.S. News & World Report features an interview with filmmaker Rory Kennedy, “New Documentary Explores the Digital Divide” (September 19, 2017):

“In making this film I really began to understand the depths of the issue and the fact that there are over a million classrooms in this country that don’t have adequate broadband, a huge number of kids who don’t have access to computers, and the reality that 77 percent of jobs are going to require technology education and background by the year 2020.”

Mozilla observes in, “Digital Inclusion Means Promoting Diversity” (2017):

“As inclusive as the Web can seem, it’s not yet an equal playing field. More than half the world is still without it; emerging economies and marginalized communities are often the last to gain access. Far fewer women are using the Internet than men. And without diversity among its creators, the Web itself will reflect unconscious biases, while personalizing algorithms can reinforce our own.”

I urge you to find the organizations in your community working to alleviate the “digital divide” and support them today. People of every generation and nation need to be included, and the time to start is now!


A few nonprofits tackling digital inclusion in Central Texas: