America Needs an Inter Tribal

“The mission of Great Promise for American Indians is to preserve the traditions, heritage and culture of American Indians, and to support the health and education needs of their youth and families. We do this to honor the past, and to ensure the future.”

I enjoyed attending the 25th annual Austin Powwow and American Indian Heritage Festival in November, 2016. To reach my Google+ photo and video album from this year’s event, follow this link.

From Wikipedia:

“A modern pow wow is a specific type of event for Native American/First Nations people to meet and dance, sing, socialize, and honor their cultures. Pow wows may be private or public. There is generally a dancing competition, often with significant prize money awarded. Pow wows vary in length from a one-day event, to major pow wows called for a special occasion which can be up to one week long.”

After a somewhat grueling but productive year in the trenches of nonprofit fundraising here in Texas, attending the event was refreshing. Young people and adults competed in colorful Native American dances. One of my favorite dances was the Inter Tribal, during which people of all “tribes” – including the audience – were invited down to the arena floor to dance together.

Did you know,

“Most of the various types of dances performed at a pow wow are descended from the dances of the Plains tribes of Canada and the United States. Besides those for the opening and closing of a pow wow session, the most common is the intertribal, where a Drum will sing a song and anyone who wants to can come and dance.”

I joined the dancers myself this year, and while marching along, I filmed one of my first Facebook Live videos. You can see it on my Facebook page in the video section. I enjoyed dancing with people of all ages and cultural backgrounds in an impressive show of unity and community.

As the New Year gets underway, our nation as a whole needs an, “Inter Tribal.” I hope Americans will come together and work together to ensure that our nation remains the greatest on Earth.

In closing, I was inspired by an article on LinkedIn by Devin D. Thorpe, Forbes Contributor and social entrepreneur, “Democrats, Let’s Stand Shoulder-to-Shoulder with Donald Trump” (November 30, 2016). I am an Independent voter, but I agree with Devin who suggests we, “put policy above politics and country ahead of party. And let’s work harder than we ever have.”

Let’s get to work in the New Year.

Did you know? You can request an Indian dance team for your school. Follow this link to Red Voices.

Giving Thanks for Diversity

“God did not burden the United States with a diversity of backgrounds, ideas and religions, He blessed America with them.” –Congressman Emanuel Cleaver (b.1944)

My continued “Thanksgiving” wish is that our nation will see diversity as a blessing. Recent years have been tumultuous for ethnic groups across America and the world. Tolerance seems to have taken a backseat to misunderstanding, irrational fear, emotional outbursts and occasional violence.

Among the many nonprofit organizations for which I have worked, those focusing on the environment have taught me that human beings are no different from other animals in the sense that they have developed physically in unique and interesting ways over tens of thousands of years.

Yet oddly enough, while we are endlessly fascinated by the physical diversity found in birds, mammals, fish and the like, when it comes to our own species some of us are intolerant of those who look and behave differently from our own group. We sometimes fear those who hold religious beliefs dissimilar from our own, and those who maintain cultural traditions we do not understand. Is it perhaps true that:

“From the deepest desires often come the deadliest hate.” -Socrates (469 to 399 B.C.)

During a recent SXSW, I attended a series of sessions on Tech Inclusion. Hosted by Galvanize and the Clinton Foundation’s No Ceilings Initiative, the panel discussions began early on a Sunday morning in downtown Austin at the then-new offices of Atlassian, and continued all day. I learned about the challenges LGBTQIA citizens have securing and holding “regular” corporate jobs, about the misperceptions veterans re-entering the workforce face, how underrepresented minorities struggle in the workplace, as well as older generations and women.

After listening for several hours of well-considered discussion and dialogue, I felt the Tech Inclusion presentations should be televised and made available to a much broader audience. Not only the tech industry but every industry – and the general populace – would benefit.

While I revel in diversity, clearly, many are suffering at the hands of others as a result of being “different.” But I am giving thanks for a diverse and fascinating world.

And, I hope you will join me in promoting tolerance and understanding as we move forward toward 2017 and beyond. The survival of our species depends upon it.

“It is time for parents to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.” –Maya Angelou, American poet (1928-2014)

Best wishes to you and yours.

Sharing below a few potential resources for further information:

 

 

Media and Nonprofits | A Worthwhile Partnership

For years, I immersed myself in nonprofit fundraising, paying relatively little attention to attracting the media to my projects. There never seemed to be enough time to do anything other than organize my campaigns, identify and solicit donors.

But as time moves forward, I have come to appreciate how media can help nonprofit organizations attract public attention to their good work, and lend credibility to their causes. Media coverage is something nonprofits can brag about. But one must consider how best to go about obtaining it.

When I moved to San Antonio in 2010, I became a regular attendee of Social Media Breakfast. There I met people from all walks of life attempting innovative approaches to advertising and to gaining media attention using social media. Everyone involved believed heartily that media attention was integral to the success of their ventures. And I learned a great deal (thank you, Jennifer Navarrete).

Karen Addis, APR wrote for GuideStar, “Breaking Through the Noise: How to Get Media Attention for Your Nonprofit” (July 8, 2013). She states the quandary well:

When it comes to pitching your organization to the media you are at a distinct advantage because everyone, including the media, loves a good story. That’s where nonprofits shine; they are never at a loss for powerful stories. The challenge, however, comes in getting a reporter’s attention for a story that often is not breaking news. In today’s competitive media market with fewer reporters to target that is becoming increasingly difficult.

I met Nancy Schwarz of Getting Attention! via NTEN: Nonprofit Technology Network. In her article, “Three Steps to Better Media Coverage” Nancy notes one can outsource media work, but the best is done “in house.”

Although media responsibilities are frequently outsourced to an agency or consultant(s), that’s not a must. …If possible, it’s best for a staff person to develop relationships with key media contacts. You and your colleagues are the subject experts and must be prepared to work directly with the press to ensure powerful, accurate coverage.

Nancy also provides helpful information you will want to read about crafting press releases.

Kathryn Hall discusses a contemporary approach to gaining media attention for npENGAGE in, “Five Way to Ensure Your Event Makes Headline News” (August 23, 2013).

The traditional press release has been eclipsed in the modern news cycle. Instead, we want to make it as easy as possible for journalists to see the news potential of your piece, and give a head start on writing the story you hope they will write. Include the following key items to make it easier for a reporter or blogger to develop your story into a feature, and increase the likelihood of it getting picked up.

Those items include direct quotes from “in the know” sources, original quotes that make your story read like news, and photos. “Great photos can help ensure your story gets picked up.”

Here in Austin, I have enjoyed attending a few gatherings of PR Over Coffee, a Meetup that focuses on how to gain the attention of media in an increasingly crowded and competitive market. Guest speakers include veterans of the media who disclose how they work (and they are not all alike, mind you), what they prefer in terms of communication, and other helpful tips for gaining attention.

A sometimes troublesome issue for nonprofits is the increasingly visual nature of communications combined with the failure of the email servers of the media outlets (barraged with email), to accept large image files as email attachments. One of the best ideas I have heard comes from Jan Buchholz of the Austin Business Journal: upload your images to a cloud storage platform, and provide a link to the image files in your email inquiry. Yes, reporters respond to visual imagery. Many of them are also confounded about how to develop meaningful stories without strong visual imagery.

Click to read The Social Media Reporter. I have discovered reporters sometimes follow me when I "cover" such events as Austin TechBreakfast. I enjoy that.
Click to read The Social Media Reporter for some helpful guidance. I have discovered media sometimes follow me when I “cover” such events as Austin TechBreakfast on Twitter and Instagram. The takeaway is, yes, you can become your own social media reporter.

Help A Reporter Out is a free online database that pairs media representatives with people who have information to share. I urge nonprofits to sign-up to become “subject matter experts.”

Help a Reporter Out (HARO) is the most popular sourcing service in the English-speaking world, connecting journalists with relevant expert sources to meet journalists’ demanding deadlines and enable brands to tell their stories. HARO distributes more than 50,000 journalist queries from highly respected media outlets each year.

I am on the HARO list and I have shared requests for information with my nonprofit colleagues, when I spot a reporter in need of an expertise the nonprofit can provide. I do hope the nonprofit sector as a whole will become more engaged with the media via the impressive HARO platform.

Kerri Karvetski wrote for Kivi’s Nonprofit Communications Blog a humorous but genuinely insightful way to gain attention for your nonprofit cause through “newsjacking,” “Nonprofits @ the Oscars: How to Photobomb, Newsjack and Steal the Spotlight at the Academy Awards” (February 11, 2016).

Think you can’t connect with the Oscars? Let’s look at the issues explored in this year’s nominees: The Big Short -Financial reform; Bridge of Spies – Right to fair trial; Brooklyn – Immigration; Mad Max: Fury Road – Women’s rights (click to read for more ideas)

Yes, I have been known to “newsjack” for a good cause. You might consider polite “newsjacking” for other highly visible events with a strong online presence.

Before closing, here are a few thoughts about what I call “media stewardship.”

When you secure media coverage, do you thank the reporter by contacting them directly, and by following them on social media? Why not create a separate media coverage page on your website where you can thank the media for its attention to your good work, and list links to their individual stories – whether they be video interviews or write-ups – so your nonprofit website is linked to theirs, and they are recognized for their coverage. To create your media page and manage it over time, consider creating your own Google news alert. You will sometimes discover news stories have appeared, but the staff of your nonprofit may be unaware of them. The regular alerts help you keep track, so you never miss another one!